PDI Screen

Presented by: Juan Roldán, Camilo Cerro

The design of the PDI Screen project began as a first attempt to establish a first collaboration between the Interior Design department and local firms in the Interior Design sector from the region. We have called this type of actions as “forays”, understanding them as small scale and short-term actions. Design, production, fabrication and installation happens in less than three weeks, and includes several steps of prototyping and installation on site to discuss with the team (students-instructors-client) the possible changes, modifications and improvements. This works has been more beneficial than expected because: • Allows students and instructors to design within a real environment (it is not design in the vacuum of the academia). • Establishes a real relationship with clients, really intense, which shows our students behaviors and manners. • Provides elements where to clash applied design research: materials, methods, finishes, budgets and schedule. From the aesthetic point of view, the project started as a study of systemic density in an attempt to emulate natural conglomerations. From a material perspective we used the opportunity to experiment with plastic coding, and sprayed finishes. The final colors were chosen by the client from an array of samples produced with the sole purpose of studying the potential diversity of finished that can take place in a minimalist design. Most of our experimentation took place on solving the problems presented by producing a modular joining mechanism. The final result ended up being a tri-arm element, laser-cut from black glossy acrylic. To arrive to this element, multiple reiterations had to be designed to solve the problems created by the idea of density we were trying to emulate. The density had to be uniform, and natural looking but at the same time controllable. The final system allows to have a controlled growth of the cluster, deploying the design in three stages: allocation of try-arm columns (structural core), addition of single elements by triangulation (buttresses) and placement of satellites (low tables and lower single elements) to sparse and create a fluffier edge. The end result is one piece surprisingly simple, which reproduces nature in a very subtle form, appearing as if it had grown on site. The final system allows to have a controlled growth of the cluster, deploying the design in three stages: allocation of try-arm columns (structural core), addition of single elements by triangulation (buttresses) and placement of satellites (low tables and lower single elements) to sparse and create a fluffier edge.

References:

  • Tabbara, Faysal.2014.Almost Natural. Dubai: Design Week
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